Azure Outage Post-Mortem Part 3

My previous blog posts, Azure Outage Post-Mortem – Part 1 and Azure Outage Post-Mortem Part 2,made some assumptions based upon limited information coming from blog posts and twitter. I just attended a session at Ignite which gave a little more clarity as to what actually happened. Sometime tomorrow you should be able to view the session for yourself.

BRK3075 – Preparing for the unexpected: Anatomy of an Azure outage

The official Root Cause Analysis they said will be published soon, but in the meantime here are some tidbits of information gleaned from the session.

The outage was NOT caused by a lightning strike as previously reported. Instead, due to the nature of the storm there were electrical storm sags and swells, which locked out a chiller plant in the 1st datacenter. During this first outage they were able to recover the chiller quickly with no noticeable impact. Shortly thereafter, there was a second outage at a second datacenter which was not recovered properly, which began an unfortunate series of events.

During this 2nd outage, Microsoft states that “Engineers didn’t triage alerts correctly – chiller plant recovery was not prioritized”. There were numerous alerts being triggered at this time, and unfortunately the chiller being offline did not receive the priority it should have. The RCA as to why that happened is still being investigated.

Microsoft states that of course redundant chiller systems are in place. However, the cooling systems were not set to automatically failover. Recently installed new equipment had not been fully tested, so it was set to manual mode until testing had been completed.

After 45 minutes the ambient cooling failed, hardware shutdown, air handlers shut down because they thought there was a fire, and staff had been evacuated due to the false fire alarm. During this time temperature in the data center was increasing and some hardware was not shut down properly, causing damage to some storage and networking.

After manually resetting the chillers and opening the air handlers the temperature began to return to normal. It took about 3 hours and 29 minutes before they had a complete picture of the status of the datacenter.

The biggest issue was there was damage to storage. Microsoft’s primary concern is data protection, so short of the enter datacenter sinking into a sinkhole or a meteor strike taking out the datacenter, Microsoft will work to recover data to ensure no data loss. This of course took some time, which extend the overall length of the outage. The good news is that no customer data was lost, the bad news is that it seemed like it took 24-48 hours for things to return to normal, based upon what I read on Twitter from customers complaining about the prolonged outage.

Everyone expected that this outage would impact customers hosted in the South Central Region, but what they did not expect was that the outage would have an impact outside of that region. In the session, Microsoft discusses some of the extended reach of the outage.

Azure Service Manager (ASM) – This controls Azure “Classic” resources, AKA, pre-ARM resources. Anyone relying on ASM could have been impacted. It wasn’t clear to me why this happened, but it appears that South Central Region hosts some important components of that service which became unavailable.

Visual Studio Team Service (VSTS) – Again, it appears that many resources that support this service are hosted in the South Central Region. This outage is described in great detail by Buck Hodges (@tfsbuck), Director of Engineering, Azure DevOps this blog post.

Postmortem: VSTS 4 September 2018

Azure Active Directory (AAD) – When the South Central region failed, AAD did what it was designed to due and started directing authentication requests to other regions. As the East Coast started to wake up and online, authentication traffic started picking up. Now normally AAD would handle this increase in traffic through autoscaling, but the autoscaling has a dependency on ASM, which of course was offline. Without the ability to autoscale, AAD was not able to handle the increase in authentication requests. Exasperating the situation was a bug in Office clients which made them have very aggressive retry logic, and no backoff logic. This additional authentication traffic eventually brought AAD to its knees.

They ran out of time to discuss this further during the Ignite session, but one feature that they will be introducing will be giving users the ability to failover Storage Accounts manually in the future. So in the case where recovery time objective (RTO) is more important than (RPO) the user will have the ability to recover their asynchronously replicated geo-redundant storage in an alternate data center should Microsoft experience another extended outage in the future.

Until that time, you will have to rely on other replication solutions such as SIOS DataKeeper Azure Site Recovery, or application specific replication solutions which give you the ability to replicate data across regions and put the ability to enact your disaster recovery plan in your control.

 

 

Azure Outage Post-Mortem Part 3

Azure Outage Post-Mortem Part 2

My previous blog post says that Cloud-to-Cloud or Hybrid-Cloud would give you the most isolation from just about any issue a CSP could encounter. However, in this particular failure had Availability Zones been available in the South Central region most of the downtime caused by this natural disaster could have been avoided. Microsoft published a Preliminary RCA of the September 4th South Central Outage.

The most important part of that whole summary is as follows…

“Despite onsite redundancies, there are scenarios in which a datacenter cooling failure can impact customer workloads in the affected datacenter.”

What does that mean to you? If your applications all run in the same datacenter you are susceptible to the same type of outage in the future. In Microsoft’s defense, this really shouldn’t be news to you as this has always been true whether you run in Azure, AWS, Google or even your own datacenter. Failure to plan ahead with data replication to a different datacenter and a plan in place to quickly recover your applications in those datacenters in the event of a disaster is simply a lack of planning on your part.

While Microsoft doesn’t publish exact Availability Zone locations, if you believe this map published here you could guess that they are probably anywhere from a 2-10 miles apart from each other.

Azure Datacenters.png

In all but the most extreme cases, replicating data across Availability Zones should be sufficient for data protection. Some applications such as SQL Server have built in replication technology, but for a broad range of applications, operating systems and data types you will want to investigate block level replication SANless cluster solutions. SANless cluster solutions have traditionally been used for multisite clusters, but the same technology can also be used in the cloud across Availability Zones, Regions, or Hybrid-Cloud for high availability and disaster recovery.

Implementing a SANless cluster that spans Availability Zones, whether it is Azure, AWS or Google, is a pretty simple process given the right tools. Here are a few resources to help get you started.

Step-by-Step: Configuring a File Server Cluster in Azure that Spans Availability Zones

How to Build a SANless SQL Server Failover Cluster Instance in Google Cloud Platform

MS SQL Server v.Next on Linux with Replication and High Availability #Azure #Cloud #Linux

Deploying Microsoft SQL Server 2014 Failover Clusters in #Azure Resource Manager (ARM)

SANless SQL Server Clusters in AWS

SANless Linux Cluster in AWS Quick Start

If you are in Azure you may also want to consider Azure Site Recovery (ASR). ASR lets you replicate the entire VM from one Azure region to another region. ASR will replicate your VMs in real-time and allow you to do a non-disruptive DR test whenever you like. It supports most versions of Windows and Linux and is relatively easy to set up.

You can also create replication jobs that have “Multi-VM Consistency”, meaning that servers that must be recovered from the exact same point in time can be put together in this consistency group and they will have the exact same recovery point. What this means is if you wanted to build a SANless cluster with DataKeeper in a single region for high availability you have two options for DR. One is you could extend your SANless cluster to a node in a different region, or else you could simply use ASR to replicate both nodes in a consistency group.

asr

The trade off with ASR is that the RPO and RTO is not as good as you will get with a SANless multi-site cluster, but it is easy to configure and works with just about any application. Just be careful, if your application exceeds 10 MBps in disk write activity on a regular basis ASR will not be able to keep up. Also, clusters based on Storage Spaces Direct cannot be replicated with ASR and in general lack a good DR strategy when used in Azure.

For a while after Managed Disks were released ASR did not fully support them until about a year later. Full support for Managed Disks was a big hurdle for many people looking to use ASR. Fortunately since about February of 2018 ASR fully supports Managed Disks. However, there is another problem that was just introduced.

With the introduction of Availability Zones ASR is once again caught behind the times as they currently don’t support VMs that have been deployed in Availability Zones.

2018-09-25_00-10-24
Support matrix for replicating from one Azure region to another

I went ahead and tried it anyway. I seemed to be able to configure replication and was able to do a test failover.

ASR-and-AZ
I used ASR to replicate SQL1 and SQL3 from Central to East US 2 and did a test failover. Other than not placing the VMs in AZs in East US 2 it seems to work.

I’m hoping to find out more about this limitation at the Ignite conference. I don’t think this limitation is as critical as the Managed Disk limitation was, just because Availability Zones aren’t widely available yet. So hopefully ASR will pick up support for Availability Zones as other regions light up Availability Zones and they are more widely adopted.

 

 

Azure Outage Post-Mortem Part 2

Lightning Never Strikes Twice: Surviving the #Azure Cloud Outage

Yesterday morning I opened my Twitter feed to find that many people were impacted by an Azure outage. When I tried to access the resource page that described the outage and the current resources impacted even that page was unavailable. @AzureSupport was providing updates via Twitter.

The original update from @AzureSupport came in at 7:12 AM EDT

Azure Outage 2

Looking back on the Twitter feed it seems as if the problem initially began an hour or two before that.

Azure Support 10

It quickly became apparent that the outages had a wider spread impact than just the SOUTH CENTRAL US region as originally reported. It seems as if services that relied on Azure Active Directory could have been impacted as well and customers trying to provision new subscriptions were having issues.

Azure 11

And 24 hours later the problem has not been completely resolved and it according to the last update this morning…

Azure Outage 1

Untitled design (6)

So what could you have done to minimize the impact of this outage? No one can blame Microsoft for a natural disaster such as a lightning strike. But at the end of the day if your only disaster recovery plan is to call, tweet and email Microsoft until the issue is resolved, you just received a rude awakening. IT IS UP TO YOU to ensure you have covered all the bases when it comes to your disaster recovery plan.

While the dust is still settling on exactly what was impacted and what customers could have done to minimize the downtime, here are some of my initial thoughts.

Availability Sets (Fault Domains/Update Domains) – In this scenario, even if you built Failover Clusters, or leveraged Azure Load Balancers and Availability Sets, it seems the entire region went offline so you still would have been out of luck. While it is still recommended to leverage Availability Sets, especially for planned downtime, in this case you still would have been offline.

Availability Zones – While not available in the SOUTH CENTRAL US region yet, it seems that the concept of Availability Zones being rolled out in Azure could have minimized the impact of the outage. Assuming the lightning strike only impacted one datacenter, the other datacenter in the other Availability Zone should have remained operational. However, the outages of the other non-regional services such as Azure Active Directory (AAD) seems to have impacted multiple regions, so I don’t think Availability Zones would have isolated you completely.

Global Load Balancers, Cross Region Failover Clusters, etc. – Whether you are building SANLess clusters that cross regions, or using global load balancers to spread the load across multiple regions, you may have minimized the impact of the outage in SOUTH CENTRAL US, but you may have still been susceptible to the AAD outage.

Hybrid-Cloud, Cross Cloud – About the only way you could guarantee resiliency in a cloud wide failure scenario such as the one Azure just experienced is to have a DR plan that includes having realtime replication of data to a target outside of your primary cloud provider and a plan in place to bring applications online quickly in this other location. These two locations should be entirely independent and should not rely on services from your primary location to be available, such as AAD. The DR location could be another cloud provider, in this case AWS or Google Cloud Platform seem like logical alternatives, or it could be your own datacenter, but that kind of defeats the purpose of running in the cloud in the first place.

Software as a Service – While Software as service such as Azure Active Directory (ADD), Azure SQL Database (Database-as-Service) or one of the many SaaS offerings from any of the cloud providers can seem enticing, you really need to plan for the worst case scenario. Because you are trusting a business critical application to a single vendor you may have very little control in terms of DR options that includes recovery OUTSIDE of the current cloud service provider. I don’t have any words of wisdom here other than investigate your DR options before implementing any SaaS service, and if recovery outside of the cloud is not an option than think long and hard before you sign-up for that service. Minimally make the business stake owners aware that if the cloud service provider has a really bad day and that service is offline there may be nothing you can do about it other than call and complain.

I think in the very near future you will start to hear more and more about cross cloud availability and people leveraging solutions like SIOS DataKeeper to build robust HA and DR strategies that cross cloud providers. Truly cross cloud or hybrid cloud models are the only way to truly insulate yourself from most conceivable cloud outages.

If you were impacted from this latest outage I’d love to hear from you. Tell me what went down, how long you were down, and what you did to recover. What are you planning to do so that in the future your experience is better?

Lightning Never Strikes Twice: Surviving the #Azure Cloud Outage

“Incomplete Communication with Cluster” with local Storage Space for SQL Server cluster

When building a SANless SQL Server cluster with SIOS DataKeeper, or when configuring Always On Availability Groups for SQL Server, you may consider striping together multiple disk in a Simple Storage Space (RAID 0) for performance. This is very commonly done in the cloud where each instance typically his backed by hardware resiliency, so RAID 0 is not really all that risky.

For instance, I had a recent customer in AWS that wanted to max out his IOPS to 80,000, the maximum IOPS currently available to a single instance. Now keep in mind, only the largest EBS optimized instance sizes supports 80,000 IOPS, so you want to make sure you know what maximum IOPS your particular instance size supports.

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/EBSOptimized.html

In this case we had ac5.18xlarge instance which does support 80,000 IOPS. However, any individual EBS Provisioned IOPS volume only supports up to 32,000 IOPS. The only way to achieve 80,000 IOPS when writing to any single volume is to strip three of these volumes together in a Simple Storage Space.

Herein lies the rub, if you try to do that in an existing cluster things are going to go haywire pretty fast. Fellow MVP Joey D’Antoni recently blogged about the issue and it appears to still be an issue in the Windows Server 2019 preview.

Just as Joey suggests, I always advise my customers to build out the nodes and any Storage Spaces BEFORE they start the clustering process. This makes the process go much smoother. It also allows the customer to have some time to benchmark the server’s performance before they add any replication, to  ensure everything is working as expected.

 

 

“Incomplete Communication with Cluster” with local Storage Space for SQL Server cluster

Your student could be the next Doogie Howser of Cloud Computing with free training and cloud computing resources

Students with any interest in Information Technology or Computer Science are going to be joining a world dominated by Cloud Computing. And of course the major cloud service providers (CSP) would all love to see the young people embrace their cloud platform to host the next big thing like Facebook, Instagram or SnapChat. The top three CSP all have free offerings for students, hoping to win their minds and hearts.

But before you jump right in to cloud computing, the novice student might want to start with some basic fundamentals of computer programming at one of the many free online resources, including Khan Academy.

feature_khanacademy.png

Microsoft is offering free Azure services for students. There are two different offerings. The first is targeted at high school students ages 13+ and the second is geared towards college students 18+.

microsoft-azure-1.png

Microsoft Azure for Students Starter Offer is for those high school students that are interested in building applications in the cloud. While there are not as many free services or credits as being offered at the college level, there is certainly enough available for free to really get some hands on experience with some cutting edge technology for the self starter. How cool would it be for your high school to start a Cloud Computing Club, or to integrate this offering into some of the IT classes they may already be taking.

Azure for Students is targeted at the college level student and has many more features available for free. Any student in computer science or information technology should definitely get some hands on experience with these cutting edge cloud technologies and this is the perfect way to do it with no additional out of pocket expense.

A good way to get introduced to the Azure Cloud is to start with some free online training courses Microsoft delivers in partnership with Pluralsight.

logo_aws-educate.812809f63186598d26a56d443d829afa390566d1.png

AWS Educate. Not to be outdone, AWS also offers some free cloud services to students and educators. These seem to be in terms of free cloud credits, which if managed properly can go a long way. AWS also delivers an educational program that can be combined with an AP class in Computer Science if your high school wants to participate.

 

Google-Cloud-Platform.png

Google Cloud Platform (GCP) also has education grants available for computer science majors at accredited universities. These seem to be the most restrictive of the three as they are available for Computer Science Majors only at accredited universities.

GCP does also offer training, but from what I can find I don’t see any free training offerings. If you want some hands on training you will have to register for some classes. The plus side of this is that these classes all seem to be instructor led, either online or in an actual classroom. The downside is I don’t think a lot of 13 year olds are going to shell out any money to start developing on the CGP when there are other free training opportunities available on AWS or Azure.

For the ambitious young student, the resources are certainly there for you to be the next Doogie Howser of Cloud Computing.

Doogie Howser_Cloud MD_.png

 

Your student could be the next Doogie Howser of Cloud Computing with free training and cloud computing resources

Help! I can’t connect to my SQL Server multi-subnet failover cluster

I get that kind of call or email from customers all the time. I have a generic response as follows…

This has everything you need to know.

They don’t go into great detail about what to do if your connection does not support multisubnetfailover=true. If your connection does NOT support that parameter, then set registerallprovidersip to false and cleanup DNS. That procedure is described best here.
I figure I get this question often enough I probably should just flesh out my response a bit, hence the reason for this post.
In general people just aren’t aware of how multi-subnet failover clusters work. Multi-subnet failover clustering support was added in Windows Server 2012 with the addition of the “OR” technology when defining cluster resource dependencies. This allowed people to allow a Cluster Name resource to be dependent upon IP Address x.x.x.x OR IP Address y.y.y.y.
x.x.x.x would be an a cluster IP resource valid in Subnet A and y.y.y.y would be a cluster IP address valid in Subnet B. Only one address will be online at any given time, whichever address was valid for the subnet the resource was currently running on.
Microsoft SQL Server started supporting this concept starting with SQL Server 2012 with both failover cluster instances (FCI) using 3-party SANless clustering solutions like SIOS DataKeeper and SQL Server Always On Availability Groups.
By default if you create a SQL Server multi-subnet failover cluster the cluster should be automatically configured optimally, including setting up the two IP addresses, adding two A records to DNS and setting the registerallprovidersIP to true. However, on the client end you need to tell it that you are connecting to a multi-subnet failover cluster, otherwise the connection won’t be made.

Configuring the client

Configuring the client is done by adding multisubnetfailover=true to the connection string. This Microsoft documentation is a great resource, but if you just search for multisubnetfailover=true you will find a lot of information about that setting.
However, not every application will support adding that to the connection string. If you find yourself in that situation you should ask your application vendor to add support for that or show you how to do it.
However, all is not lost if you find yourself in that situation. You will want to change the behavior of the cluster so that upon failover DNS is update so that the single A record associated with the cluster client access point is updated with the new IP address. This is in lieu of having two A records in DNS, one with each cluster IP address, which is the default behavior in an multi-subnet cluster.
This article reference SharePoint, you can ignore that, the rest of the article is pretty well written to describe the process you should follow.
The highlights of that article are as follows…
Get-ClusterResource “[Network Name]” | Set-ClusterParameter RegisterAllProvidersIP 0
After restarting the cluster-name-object (basically restarting the role) & cleaning up all “A” records manually (clean-up isn’t done automatically) we can see our old A-records are still in DNS so we’ll need to delete those manually.
In addition to those steps I’d advise you to reduce the TTL on the HostRecordTTL as described in this article.
The highlight of that article is as follows.
PS C:\> Get-ClusterResource -Name cluster1FS | Set-ClusterParameter -Name HostRecordTTL -Value 300
With a Value of 300 you could potentially be waiting up to 5 minutes for your clients to reconnect after a failover, or even longer if if have a large Active Directory infrastructure and AD replication takes some time to update all the DNS servers across your infrastructure.
You are going to want to figure out what the optimal TTL is to facilitate quick client reconnections without over burdening your DNS servers with a bunch of DNS Lookup requests.
This type of configuration is common in disaster recovery configurations where your DR site is in a different subnet. It is also very common in HA deployments in AWS because different Availability Zones are in different subnets.
Let me know if you have any questions. You can always reach me on Twitter @daveberm
Help! I can’t connect to my SQL Server multi-subnet failover cluster

STORAGE SPACES DIRECT (S2D) FOR SQL SERVER FAILOVER CLUSTER INSTANCES (FCI)?

With the introduction of Windows Server 2016 Datacenter Edition a new feature called Storage Spaces Direct (S2D) was introduced. At a very high level, this solution allows you to pool together locally attached storage and present it to the cluster as a CSV for use in a Scale Out File Server, which can then be accessed over SMB 3 and used to hold cluster data such as Hyper-V VMDK files. This can also be configured in a hyper-converged (HCI) fashion such that the application and data can all run on the same set of servers.  This is a grossly over-simplified description, but for details, you will want to look here.

 

Storage Spaces Direct StackImage taken from https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/storage/storage-spaces/storage-spaces-direct-overview

The main use case targeted is hyper-converged infrastructure for Hyper-V deployments. However, there are other use cases, including leveraging this SMB storage to store SQL Server Data to be used in a SQL Server Failover Cluster Instance

Why would anyone want to do that? Well, for starters you can now build a highly available 2-node SQL Server Failover Cluster Instance (FCI) with SQL Server Standard Edition, without the need for shared storage. Previously, if you wanted HA without a SAN you pretty much were driven to buy SQL Server Enterprise Edition and make use of Always On Availability Groups or purchase SIOS DataKeeper and leverage the 3rd party solution which lets you build SANless clusters with any version of Windows or SQL Server. SQL Server Enterprise Edition can really drive up the cost of your project, especially if you were only buying it for the Availability Groups feature.

In addition to the cost associated with Availability Groups, there are a number of other technical reasons why you might prefer a Failover Cluster over an AG. Application compatibility, instance vs. database level protection, large number of databases, DTC support, trained staff, etc., are just some of the technical reasons why you may want to stick with a Failover Cluster Instance.

Microsoft lists both the SIOS DataKeeper solution and the S2D solution as two of the supported solutions for SQL Server FCI in their documentation here.

s2d

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/virtual-machines/windows/sql/virtual-machines-windows-sql-high-availability-dr

When comparing the two solutions, you have to take into account that SIOS has been allowing you to build SANless Clusters since 1999, while the S2D solution is still in its infancy.  Having said that, there are bound to be some areas where S2D has some catching up to do, or simply features that they will never support simply due to the limitations with the technology.

Have a look at the following table for an overview of some of the things you should consider before you choose your SANless cluster solution.

2018-10-05_21-13-59

If we go through this chart, we see that SIOS DataKeeper clearly has some significant advantages. For one, DataKeeper supports a much wider range of platforms, going all the way back to Windows Server 2008 R2 and SQL Server 2008 R2. The S2D solution only supports the latest releases of Windows and SQL Server 2016/2017. S2D also requires the  Datacenter Edition of Windows, which can add significantly to the cost of your deployment. In addition, SIOS delivers the ONLY HA/DR solution for SQL Server on Linux that works both on-prem and in the cloud.

[EDIT JULY 2018]
I’ve been talking to a lot of customers recently who are reporting some performance issues with S2D. When I tested S2D vs. DataKeeper about a year ago I didn’t see any significant differences in performance, but I did see S2D used about 2x the amount of CPU resources under the same load. I’ll have to revisit my test and publish a detailed blog article soon on performance. The other complaint I have been hearing is in terms of growing storage space in S2D.

But beyond the cost and platform limitations, I think the most glaring gap comes when we start to consider disaster recovery options for your SANless cluster. Allan Hirt, SQL Server Cluster guru and fellow Microsoft Cloud and Datacenter Management MVP, recently posted about this S2D limitation. In his article Revisiting Storage Spaces Direct and SQL Server FCIs  Allan points out that due to the lack of support for stretching S2D clusters across sites or including an S2D based cluster as a leg in an Always On Availability Group, the best option for DR in the S2D scenario is log shipping! This even includes replicating across Availability Zones in either Azure or AWS.

S2D in Azure
John Marlin, Program Manager for High Availability and Storage

Don’t get me wrong, log shipping has been around forever and will probably be around long after I’m gone, but that is taking a HUGE step backwards when we think about all the disaster recovery solutions we have become accustomed to, like multi-site clusters, Availability Groups, etc.

In contrast, the SIOS DataKeeper solution fully supports Always On Availability Groups, and better yet – it can allow you to stretch your FCI across sites to give you the best HA/DR solution you could hope to achieve in terms of RTO/RPO. In an Azure environment, DataKeeper also support Azure Site Recovery (ASR), giving you even more options for disaster recovery.

The rest of this chart is pretty self explanatory. It basically consist of a list hardware, storage and networking requirements that must be met before you can deploy an S2D cluster. An exhaustive list of S2D requirements is maintained here.  https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/storage/storage-spaces/storage-spaces-direct-hardware-requirements

The SIOS DataKeeper solution is much more lenient. It supports any locally attached storage and as long as the hardware passes cluster validation, it is a supported cluster configuration. The block level replication solution has been working great ever since 1 Gbps was considered a fast LAN and a T1 WAN connection was considered a luxury.

SANless clustering is particularly interesting for cloud deployments. The cloud does not offer traditional shared storage options for clusters. So for users in the middle of a “lift and shift” to the cloud that want to take their clusters with them they must look at alternate storage solutions. For cloud deployments, SIOS is certified for AzureAWS and Google and available in the relevant cloud marketplace. While there doesn’t appear to be anything blocking deployment of S2D based clusters in Azure or Google, there is a conspicuous lack of documentation or supportability statements from Microsoft for those platforms.

SIOS DataKeeper has been doing this since 1999. SIOS has heard all the feature requests, uncovered all the bugs, and has a rock solid solution for SANless clusters that is time tested and proven. While Microsoft S2D is a promising technology, as a 1st generation product I would wait until the dust settles and some of the feature gap closes before I would consider it for my business critical applications.

STORAGE SPACES DIRECT (S2D) FOR SQL SERVER FAILOVER CLUSTER INSTANCES (FCI)?