Protecting Business Critical Apps By @DaveBerm | @CloudExpo [#Cloud]

Protecting Business Critical Apps By @DaveBerm | @CloudExpo [#Cloud] — Gartner predicts that the bulk of new IT spending by 2016 will be for cloud platforms and applications and that nearly half of large enterprises will have cloud deployments by the end of 2017. The benefits of the cloud may be clear for applications that can tolerate brief periods of downtime, but for critical applications like SQL Server, Oracle and SAP, companies need a strategy for HA and DR protection. While traditional SAN-based clusters are not possible in these environments, SANless clusters can provide an easy, cost-efficient alternative.

Read more at http://www.sys-con.com/node/3334102/blog#

Attend my session at Cloud-Expo on June 11th at the Javits Center in NYC – http://www.cloudcomputingexpo.com/event/session/2854

 

Protecting Business Critical Apps By @DaveBerm | @CloudExpo [#Cloud]

#Azure Storage Service Interruption…Time for “Plan B”

Yesterday evening Pacific Standard Time, Azure storage services experienced a service interruption across the United States, Europe and parts of Asia, which impacted multiple cloud services in these regions.

As part of a performance update to Azure Storage, an issue was discovered that resulted in reduced capacity across services utilizing Azure Storage, including Virtual Machines, Visual Studio Online, Websites, Search and other Microsoft services.

Read the whole report on the Azure blog. http://azure.microsoft.com/blog/2014/11/19/update-on-azure-storage-service-interruption/

So what does this outage mean to those thinking about a cloud deployment? Global “interruptions” of this magnitude certainly cannot occur on any regular basis for any cloud provider that intends to remain in the cloud business, whether they are Microsoft, Amazon, Google or other. However, as a cloud architect or person responsible for a cloud deployment, you have a responsibility to your customer to have a “Plan B” in your back pocket in case the worst case scenario actually happens.

What exactly is a “Plan B”? Plan B involves having a documented procedure for recovering data and services in an alternate location in the event of a wide spread outage that impacts a cloud provider’s ability to deliver their service, despite deploying what you thought was a highly resilient cloud deployment designed to keep running even in the event of localized outages within a region, availability zone or fault domain.

At a high level you should be concerned about three things: Data Recovery, Application Recovery, and Client Access. There are many ways to address these concerns, some more automated than others and some with a better Recovery Time Objective (RTO) and Recovery Point Objective (RPO) than others.

It was just last week that I blogged about how to create a multisite cluster that stretched between the AWS cloud and the Azure cloud. This type of configuration is just what is needed in the event of an outage of the magnitude that we just experienced yesterday in the Azure cloud. https://clusteringformeremortals.com/2014/11/18/cloud-resiliency-for-sqlserver-failover-clusters-aws-to-azure-multisite-cluster/

Figure 1 – Example of a Cloud-to-Cloud Multisite Cluster Configuration

Another alternative to the “cloud-to-cloud” replication model is of course utilizing your own datacenter as a disaster recovery site for your cloud deployment. The advantages of this is that you have physical ownership of your data, but of course now you are back in the business of managing a datacenter, which can negate some of the benefit of a pure cloud deployment.

Figure 2 – Hybrid Cloud Deployment Model

If you are not ready to go full on cloud, you can still make use of the cloud as a disaster recovery site. This is probably the easiest and most cost effective way to implement an offsite datacenter for disaster recovery and to start taking advantage of what the cloud has to offer without fully committing to moving all your workloads into the cloud.

Figure 3 – Using the Cloud as a Disaster Recovery Site

The illustrations shown above make use of the host based replication solution called DataKeeper Cluster Edition to build multisite SQL Server clusters. However, DataKeeper can be used to keep any data in sync, either between different cloud providers or in the hybrid cloud model.

Microsoft is not alone in dealing with cloud outages as outages have impacted Google, Microsoft, Amazon, DropBox and many others just this year alone. Having a “Plan B” in place is a must have anytime you are relying on any cloud service.

#Azure Storage Service Interruption…Time for “Plan B”

Amazon EC2 Storage and Instance Size Considerations

When you launch a new instance you only have two options for the OS storage: Standard or Provisioned IOPS. Both are EBS volumes persistent across reboots. Many instances come with a bunch of extra ephemeral drives attached, which are NOT persistent. I usually delete these ephemeral drives so I am not tempted to store data on them. You will have to add additional EBS volumes for additional persistent storage.

This article seems to indicate that you can launch AMI’s based on the “EC2 Instance Store”, which is NOT persistent, but I’ve never seen that option. All of my instances have always had root devices that are EBS based; I have not seen one that is not EBS based. I’m assuming they mean some of the instances in the Amazon Market Place may use non-persistent volumes. http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/RootDeviceStorage.html

You’ll see the root device when you launch the instance, like I highlighted below. As long as EBS is the root device you are good to go and can be sure your changes will persist across reboots.

 

As far as instance size, it will depend on the needs of the application. The good thing about EC2 is that if you provision an AMI that is under powered, you can go back and increase the instance size, though it does require a reboot. If IOPS are important, you will want to make sure you choose an instance that is EBS optimized. See this page for the instance details. http://aws.amazon.com/ec2/instance-types/#instance-details . You’ll see the first instance type which is EBS optimized is M1.large.

Read this guide for additional tips for optimal storage configuration. http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AWSEC2/latest/UserGuide/EBSPerformance.html . One of the best tips for increased IOPS is to use multiple smaller EBS volumes and put them together in a RAID 0 on the Windows server. Because the EBS volumes are RAID1 on the backend, you are essentially deploying RAID 1+0 in your VM for optimal performance and availability.

Amazon EC2 Storage and Instance Size Considerations

It is now cheaper to get provisioned IOPS on Amazon EC2 EBS

In the old days if you wanted a guaranteed 4000 IOPS on EBS, you had to provision a minimum of a 400 GB vo0lume. Considering you pay per the GB, and provisioned IOPS are not cheap, if you only needed 100 GB of fast storage you were stuck paying for 300 GB of unused storage.

With this recent announcement Amazon has made it easier to get fast storage in smaller increments. Now if you want 4000 IOPS you can get that in EBS volumes as small as 133 GB up to 1 TB in size. Read the following press release for more information.

http://aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2013/10/09/ebs-provisioned-iops-maximum-iops-gb-ratio-increased-to-30-1/?sc_ichannel=EM&sc_icountry=EN&sc_icampaign=13Oct_Newsletter&Campaign_id=35060660&ref_=pe_467350_35060660_14

It is now cheaper to get provisioned IOPS on Amazon EC2 EBS

Webinar Invite: How to Deploy SQL Server AlwaysOn Failover Clusters in Amazon EC2 with @awscloud #amazonaws

Deploying Your Business Critical SQL Server Apps on Amazon EC2

 

Amazon Web Services (AWS) and SIOS Technology Corp, an AWS Partner Network (APN) Technology Partner, invite you to attend this live webinar to learn how to optimize mission critical SQL Server deployments on Amazon EC2.

Learn how to take advantage of the cost benefits and flexibility of Amazon EC2 while maintaining protection with native Microsoft Windows Server Failover Clustering – all without shared storage.

Who should attend:

Solution Architects, Developer, Development Leads and other SQL Professionals

Presenters:

Miles Ward, Solutions Architect, Amazon Web Services

Tony Tomarchio, Director of Field Engineering, SIOS Technology Corp

Date / Time:

Wednesday, June 5, 2013 – 10AM PT / 1PM ET

Click here to register

http://bit.ly/10VLtDu

Webinar Invite: How to Deploy SQL Server AlwaysOn Failover Clusters in Amazon EC2 with @awscloud #amazonaws

No More Free Google Apps #googleapps #azure

http://googleenterprise.blogspot.com/2012/12/changes-to-google-apps-for-businesses.html

I’m glad I got Boy Scout Troop 20 registered under the deadline. Free Google Apps was a great intro to the product for me and I looked at it as a gateway “drug” that gave me enough of a look to consider the premium version for any “serious” cloud based business operation, i.e., not a Boy Scout Troop. While $50/year per user is not expensive, it certainly can be a show stopper for many small non-profit organizations who may have otherwise been potential customers. So the question is will Microsoft take advantage of this opening to gain market share? If so, I know where I will be deploying my next cloud based small business site.

No More Free Google Apps #googleapps #azure